Four Reasons Not to Trust the TPP to Save Endangered Animals

Of the various discussions circulating about the TPP, there has been little regarding the environmental impact of this agreement.  According to the following article, (http://www.sierraclub.org/lay-of-the-land/2015/09/four-reasons-not-trust-tpp-save-endangered-animals) the TPP will not protect nature in any way.  Negotiators claim the TPP will “help protect endangered wildlife like rhinos and elephants.”  Author Ben Beachy gives fours clear reasons to not believe this statement.  His first claim is deals similar to the TPP that have been signed in the past did not live up to their promises.  For instance, years ago President Clinton  guaranteed NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) would help protect the environment; however, it turned out to be a catalyst for fossil-fuel agribusiness expansion.  There was a deal signed between the U.S. and Peru in 2007 which was said to help promote legal timber trade, yet illegal trade of timber increased.

Beachy goes on to make claims stating that the TPP’s environmental terms aren’t nearly as strict as they should be, its provisions are a major threat to endangered species, and there are alternative solutions to counteract the TPP’s danger toward animal and their habitat, but nothing is being done to limit its power.  If the TPP get’s signed this year, it will be interesting to see if it will have a negative impact, and if so, how much of a negative impact it will have on animals’ environment.

Protests in New Zealand

According to article (https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/03/12/tppa-m12.html) on World Socialist Web Site, the United States doesn’t plan to abide by the TPP truthfully.  Back in March, thousands of New Zealand citizens protested the country’s TPP agreement with the United States.  While the agreement is aimed at boosting economies and redefining “the model for trade,”  many New Zealanders are seeing this as Wall Street’s (United States) subversive attempt to control New Zealand’s economy and essentially promote global capitalism.  There’s much truth to the citizens theory, but all five of the protests in New Zealand this year have been orchestrated by socialists. These individuals are very “one-sided” when it come to these type of issues, yet it’s completely understandable.  I would be greatly concerned for my nations economy/future if I sense any indication of a takeover from a “super-power” nation.  Feel free to select the link to decide who’s being honest.

Managing Smart Manufacturing

In a description of the National Science Foundation sponsored center for Smart process Manufacturing (http://www.rockwellautomation.com/resources/downloads/rockwellautomation/pdf/about-us/company-overview/TIMEMagazineSPMcoverstory.pdf) the authors suggest that market disruptions such as a “$3000 automobile or a $300 personal computer” might be outcomes.  Plant integration, plant optimization and manufacturing knowledge are listed as the phases to get to this reality.  What are the barriers to such an evolution in manufacturing ? How much integration of people, process and technology needs to happen to transform existing manufacturing ? Will leadership for this transformation come from small, agile companies who, when successful, will be integrated into larger ones or can the large companies lead such a transformation ? Finally, how global will this phenomenon need to be to transform supply chains ?