Schoolyard Brawl

In a recent article on the website, yahoo.com, they discuss the hostile environment in the Japanese Diet over the ratification of the TPP. Japanese lawmakers recently voted to ratify the TPP, but the sensitive top quickly dissolved into and Jerry Springer episode as fights broke out on the committee floor. Many lawmakers disagreed with many of the provisions. While the deal will lower many of the tariffs for Japanese exports, the open markets will create more competition for Japanese farmers and businesses. Will more fights break out as they try to reconcile their differences? Will the deal get ratified? Will other countries show the same hostility toward each other as they attempt to ratify the deal?

 

Losing Steam

In a recent article on the website, SBS.com, they discuss the dissatisfaction that many Japanese are feeling with the proposed TPP deal. Japan is trying to become the first member nation to ratify the TPP deal in parliament, but are facing growing skepticism by the public. Only a little over one third of the population want to ratify the deal and many more are unsure whether or not this is the course to take with respect to the Japanese economy. Will the deal get done? How might this affect other countries? How will this affect the Japanese economy?

Beefy Boost

In a recent article on the website, The Cattle site, the impact of the U.S. waiting to approve the TPP deal on trade, is discussed. The only country to approve the TPP to date is Malaysia. Since there is no deal in place, tariffs on U.S. exports are extremely high. This is particularly crippling on the agricultural sector, as almost one third of gross agricultural income is through exports. The Japanese and other countries are concerned with what the U.S. will do with regard to the approving the TPP deal and are in a nervous “wait and see” mode. How can U.S. agriculture come out without too much loss? What will the U.S. ultimately do with respect to the proposed TPP deal? How will other countries respond to the U.S.’ actions?

Deal or No Deal?

In a recent article in, The Wall Street Journal, the ratification of the TPP by the involved countries is discussed. Japan is making a strong push to have their parliament ratify the TPP deal to help gain momentum for the deal in the US. Without the support of the US, the deal dies, and President Obama’s support is crucial to the deals ratification before he leaves office in January. The deal would help to open up free trade in the Asia-pacific region and eliminate costly tariffs for all parties, especially Japan. Will the deal get done in time? Will the US government ratify the deal if Japan does? What will be the implications if the deal doesn’t get approved by the 12 members?

Japanese Rice Getting Cheaper?

In a recent article in, The Japan Times, the author discusses the need for Japanese farmers to produce cheaper rice. With the signing of the new TPP deal, Japan will see an influx of international products flood their domestic markets. This is especially true in their agricultural sections. The Japanese government is teaming up with local farmers to produce cheaper and more cost effective rice, in an effort to be more competitive in overseas markets. In what ways can Japanese farmers produce a cheaper product? Will this approach work? How may this strategy affect the quality of the rice?

Earthquakes Delay TPP Approval

In a recent article in the, Japan Times, the topic of a delayed approval by Japan’s legislature is explored. Due to the recent earthquakes in Kyushu, the Japanese Legislature has pushed back discussion on the TPP to deal with the current national crisis. Because the legislature is not planning to extend the the legislative session, this will delay the TPP approval discussions until parliament is reconvened.  Both of Japan’s majority parties will meet to discuss the best solution going forward, with respect to the TPP talks. How might this delay affect the current structure of the deal? How will this impact other TPP members?

An Experienced Ally

In a recent article in the Nikkei Asian Review, the subject of counterfeit goods under the TPP deal is discussed, specifically, goods that are produced and imported into Vietnam. Japan has stepped in to help Vietnam bolster their copyright protections and reduce the amount of ‘knockoff’ products. All of this is part of an effort to help emerging economies like Vietnam, comply with the new rules of intellectual property under the TPP. Japan also plans to help countries such as Malaysia. What can Japan do to help Vietnam? In what ways will this help Vietnam’s economy? In what ways may it hurt Vietnam’s economy?