Solving the last mile delivery challenge by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

  1. Crowdsourcing

This model allows retailers and logistics partners to connect with local couriers who use their own transportation to make deliveries. In this gig economy, crowdsourcing is a great way to ensure customers get faster delivery and it also eliminates the possibility of repeat attempt deliveries by providing the option of on-demand and scheduled deliveries to customers.

  1. Brick-and-Mortar Distribution Centers

Some retailers are using their storefront as a solution to the quick delivery problem. They have transformed their stores into distribution centers so that options such as same-day delivery are available to the customers.

  1. Smart Technology

The advancements in technology have inspired solutions that are cost-effective and convenient for both the retailer, as well as the customer. They make use of smart technology like sensors to provide retailers information regarding temperature variation in packaging, weather conditions for route planning, etc.

  1. Data Analytics

Advanced analytics (such as machine learning) help retailers optimize their last mile delivery operations. Data analytics can inform the company (or logistics partners) regarding customer-specific delivery constraints. Studying GPS traces along with relevant insights into the availability of local infrastructures such as roads and parking spaces can help make the entire process more efficient.

  1. Futuristic Delivery

Many startups, retailers and logistics services, are discovering new ways to tackle last mile delivery. Drone delivery, for instance, can not only shorten the time spent on delivery but also reduce the expensive human workforce. This workforce can then be directed towards more complex tasks. Autonomous self-driving vehicles with lockers are predicted to be the most dominant form of last mile delivery in the future.

Reference:

6 Last Mile Delivery Challenges and Solutions in Today’s Market. (2018, December 28). Retrieved from https://volttech.io/last-mile-delivery-market/.

 Questions:

  1. What are the different ways to tackle the last mile delivery problem?
  2. How do brick and mortar stores help in solving the last mile delivery problems?
  3. What are the futuristic delivery options to solve the last mile delivery problems?

 

How drones will benefit supply chains by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

Drones speed up operations and decrease delivery times for the end user while cutting down on supply chain costs.

Asset Management

Manually monitoring inventory can require workers to spend extraordinary amounts of time and resources to count products on shelves. Keeping track and monitoring inventory levels can be an exhaustive process when done periodically, especially during high order demand periods such as the holidays. The use of drones to scan and check inventory anywhere in the warehouse using OCR, RFID, and barcode readers can offer better inventory management, especially when the drone can move from warehouse to warehouse on the property in moments and deliver this information instantaneously to integrated warehouse management software.

Speeding up Deliveries Between Commercial Buildings

Raw materials can be moved from warehouse to manufacturing floor with the use of drones. Drones can also move finished products from warehouse shelves to store shelves, or place products on pallets for shipping to end users and retailers.

Monitoring Supply Chain Delivery Routes

Additional capabilities involve monitoring supply chain routes for disruptions that could impact truck deliveries. These drones can monitor road conditions, construction slow-downs and other hazards while reporting the information to logistics managers who can quickly select alternative shipping routes.

Reference:

Drones and Supply Chain: How they May Impact the Process. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ecsourcinggroup.com/drones-and-supply-chain-how-they-may-impact-the-process/.

Questions:

  1. How do drones impact supply chain?
  2. How will drones help cut supply chain costs?
  3. How will drones help in asset management?

 

 

How to streamline procurement in the future of supply chains by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

Here are some recommendations of how companies can thrive with all the disruptions taking place in the field of supply chain and change their procurement strategies to keep up.

  1. How to plan for impacts of automation and migration of workforce

Mass migration on a large scale, along with forecasts that significant numbers of workers will be displaced by automation, will increase volatility in supply chain labor dynamics. This volatility could be mitigated through responsible and inclusive labor practices. Companies with supply chains that expect significant uptake of automation through 2025 could insist that key suppliers develop clear plans to support a sustainable workforce transition.

  1. How to build responsible regional sourcing hubs

Growth in new markets and demographics and meeting customer demands for customized, on-demand goods and services will require understanding and meeting new consumption patterns and preferences, as well as providing goods and services in new locations and formats. In response, supply chain leaders will have an opportunity to develop nimble, regional supplier networks that can meet both commercial expectations and sustainability aspirations.

  1. Digitalize Supplier Assessment and Engagement

With more data about supply chains produced and disseminated than ever before, supply chain leaders have the opportunity to rethink how they collect and interpret supply chain information. Practitioners will need to hone in on the supply chain information that is decision-useful in a sea of available data and dashboards and will need to reconsider which data they need to commission and how it is collected.

  1. Strengthen Supply Chain Transparency and Disclosure

The regulations that shape mandatory corporate disclosures about sourcing practices, futuristic supply chain leaders can prepare for a variety of possible future scenarios through enhancing both visibility into supply chain practices and disclosures about those practices. Enhanced transparency will support supply chain leaders in the case that global trade is transformed by political shifts toward economic nationalism.

  1. Embed Climate-Smart Supply Chain Planning

To prepare for the environmental changes and other supply chain risks that come with it, companies will need to take into account climate risk and preparedness into supply chain planning models, seek alternative materials and resources where necessary, and look for new ways to secure supply and minimize disruptions in their supply chains.This would also mean working with suppliers that share a commitment towards climate awareness and action.

Reference:

Future of Supply Chains 2025: Blog. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.bsr.org/en/our-insights/primers/future-of-supply-chains-2025.

 Questions:

  1. How can companies plan for shifts in procurement trends?
  2. How will climate-smart supply chains be useful in the future?
  3. How will regional sourcing hubs be useful?

 

Autonomous Vehicles transforming supply chains by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

Last Mile Delivery and Distribution Center Implications

The final mile of delivery is usually a bottleneck in the delivery process, both to suppliers and distributors alike. They result in delays frequently, even with the close proximity of the product to the end consumer. Thus, companies have begun experimenting with autonomous vehicles, that could deliver goods to the end costumer without the presence of a driver within the vehicle. Self-driven vehicles seem to affect coordination by decreasing costs and delays. They may to incredibly affect distribution and production centers as well. A common hone has been to construct these in cheaper areas, where good roads and human resources were available. With a move in customer prerequisites that presently call for speedier deliveries, these huge centers will have to be built closer to the end buyer. These centers will also have to be smaller in size, since companies want to be present near the end consumer at various places rather than being present in limited or central locations. This would increase the cost of real estate, warehouse costs and operational costs. However, these costs can be offset by the reduction in costs due to the implementation of these autonomous vehicles for the last mile deliveries. These vehicles can operate for longer hours, are less prone to accidents due to human errors, thus increasing operational efficiencies.

No drivers for long hauls

It is most likely that these autonomous vehicles will see their implementation in long distance travel first. Since driving on highways is more predictable than on city roads, it requires for lesser skills to navigate. Currently, a large chunk of the transportation costs arise from having to pay drivers. Also, drivers can only drive for a certain number of hours at a stretch and then need to rest. Thus, the vehicle lies idle for that duration. Hence, driverless vehicles would reduce these costs and improve efficiencies.

Corporations are also looking into “platooning”,  in which a group of trucks would travel together over long distances.  The lead vehicle would fix a speed and direction and the following vehicles would just have to follow it.During the last leg of the travel, or the last miles, these vehicles would go in their separate directions respectively. This would not only reduce the costs of having drivers, but also reduce the risk accidents and fuel costs.

Reference:

Impact of Autonomous Vehicles in Your Supply Chain – Bâton Global. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.batonglobal.com/post/impact-of-autonomous-vehicles-in-your-supply-chain.

Questions:

  1. How will autonomous vehicles change supply chain as we know?
  2. How will driverless vehicles solve the last mile delivery issue?
  3. How can driverless vehicles be used to reduce transportation costs?

 

 

Disruptive Innovations transforming  logistics by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

Disruptive innovation and bid data can address many challenges in logistics. Some of them are:

  1. The Last Mile of Shipping Can Be Quickened – The last mile of a supply chain is notoriously inefficient, costing up to 28% of the overall delivery cost of a package.
  2. Reliability Will Be More Transparent – As sensors become more prevalent in transportation vehicles, shipping, and throughout the supply chain, they can provide data enabling greater transparency than has ever been possible.
  3. Routes Will Be Optimized – If you underestimate how many vehicles a particular route or delivery will require, then you run the risk of giving customers a late shipment, which negatively affects your client relationships and brand image. Optimizing saves money and avoids late shipments.
  4.  Sensitive Goods Are Shipped With Higher Quality – Keeping perishables fresh has been a constant challenge for logistics companies. However, big data and the Internet of Things could give delivery drivers and managers a much better idea of how they can prevent costs due to perished goods. A temperature sensor inside the truck could alert the driver, and suggest alternate routes.
  5.  Automation of Warehouses and The Supply Chain – The ability to accurately predict demand in every DC, retailer, and customer is the holy grail of being able to deploy inventory where and when it is needed.
  6.  Better inventory deployment and labor management – For retail store managers, planning shifts to meet customer demand is a sensitive task- overstaffing kills profitability, and understaffing results in angry customers.  Planning has always been done based on history.  One retailer took into account the following additional data:
  • New delivery times
  • Local circumstances and holidays
  • Road construction
  • Weather forecasts

Big data and predictive analytics gives logistics companies the extra edge they need to overcome these obstacles. Sensors on delivery trucks, weather data, road maintenance data, fleet maintenance schedules, real time fleet status indicators, and personnel schedules can all be integrated into a system that looks at the past historical trends and gives advice accordingly.

References:

Swingle, K. (2017, September 25). Disruptive Innovation in Logistics. Retrieved from https://www.spartanwarehouse.com/blog/spartan-logistics-understanding-big-date-and-how-its-revolutionizing-logistics.

Questions:

  1. What challenges can be fixed with big data and disruptive innovations in logistics?
  2. How does big data help in better inventory deployment?
  3. How does big data improve reliability in transportation?

 

Automation in Manufacturing by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

Three types of automation in production can be distinguished: (1) fixed automation, (2) programmable automation, and (3) flexible automation.

Fixed automation, also known as “hard automation,” refers to an automated production facility in which the sequence of processing operations is fixed by the equipment configuration. In effect, the programmed commands are contained in the machines in the form of cams, gears, wiring, and other hardware that is not easily changed over from one product style to another. This form of automation is characterized by high initial investment and high production rates. It is therefore suitable for products that are made in large volumes. Examples of fixed automation include machining transfer lines found in the automotive industry, automatic assembly machines, and certain chemical processes.

Programmable automation is a form of automation for producing products in batches. The products are made in batch quantities ranging from several dozen to several thousand units at a time. For each new batch, the production equipment must be reprogrammed and changed over to accommodate the new product style. This reprogramming and changeover take time to accomplish, and there is a period of nonproductive time followed by a production run for each new batch. Production rates in programmable automation are generally lower than in fixed automation, because the equipment is designed to facilitate product changeover rather than for product specialization. A numerical-control machine tool is a good example of programmable automation. The program is coded in computer memory for each different product style, and the machine tool is controlled by the computer program. Industrial robots are another example.

Flexible automation is an extension of programmable automation. The disadvantage with programmable automation is the time required to reprogram and change over the production equipment for each batch of new product. This is lost production time, which is expensive. In flexible automation, the variety of products is sufficiently limited so that the changeover of the equipment can be done very quickly and automatically. The reprogramming of the equipment in flexible automation is done off-line; that is, the programming is accomplished at a computer terminal without using the production equipment itself. Accordingly, there is no need to group identical products into batches; instead, a mixture of different products can be produced one right after another.

References:

(n.d.). Numerical control. Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/technology/automation/Numerical-control

Questions:

  1. What are the different forms of automation in manufacturing?
  2. How is flexible automation different from programmable automation?
  3. What is are the disadvantages of programmable automation?

3D PRINTING – Eliminating Wastes and Reducing Carbon Footprint by Abhilasha Satpathy, DCMME Center Graduate Student Assistant

The economic advantages of metal additive manufacturing as an alternative to traditional methods are clear, but the reduced environmental impact may be even more important to the future of industry.

Shipping: An Enormous Carbon Footprint

The flow of raw materials into a manufacturing facility and finished goods out of it require enormous energy inputs allocated to shipping. Given that traditional manufacturing has been heavily reliant on fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution, this process exacts a major toll on the environment. Together, the transportation sector accounts for over 30 percent of all U.S. emissions. Industrial transportation related to shipping undoubtedly comprises a major segment of this total.Complex, disjointed supply chains result in an end-use product that requires inputs to be shipped from hundreds of suppliers. Further, the completed product goes through multiple layers of distribution before it arrives in its buyer’s hands. 3D printing can’t fix all these problems, but it does have the potential to dramatically cut the number of links in the chain by allowing local, on-demand manufacturing of a huge variety of components. Without a doubt, 3D printing will eliminate millions of component shipping journeys in the coming decade.

Traditional Processes Waste Vital Resources

The largest segment of the metal parts fabrication industry is “subtractive” processes like CNC milling, in which material is cut away from a block to produce a final part.This brings us back to the key word, “subtractive.” The problem with this type of manufacturing is that any of the original block of metal that is cut away is waste. That wasted material represents additional resources that must be extracted from the Earth via potentially harmful mining practices.

Even worse, the final outcome for the scrap material itself involves one of two things:

  1. Additional shipping and processing to take advantage of whatever economic value the cast-off still has
  2. A trip to the local landfill, where industrial overcrowding is already a significant issue

Metal 3D printing, when economically viable, provides a nearly perfect solution to this problem. Because it’s an additive process, whereby material is layered onto itself in an exact pattern, there is virtually no waste associated. Only the metal that actually comprises the final component is used. The unused material can be recycled.This could mean the difference between 95% waste with CNC machining and < 1% waste using metal AM.

Toxic Byproducts are Common in Metal Manufacturing

Certain types of metal manufacturing, most notably CNC machining and metal injection molding, require the use of toxic substances as part of their process. The oils and lubricants needed to ensure CNC machines run properly are often dangerous to the environment. The finishing process for these parts can also make use of fluids that can be damaging if handled incorrectly. These must be handled carefully and disposed of properly.Needless to say, “properly” isn’t a standard to which all manufacturers worldwide are held. Some percentage of the harmful agents used in both CNC machining and metal injection molding will make it into the air, water, or soil that supports the community around a plant. It’s hard to quantify this, but the environmental impact is real.Standards for proper disposal of hazardous chemicals associated with conventional metal manufacturing can vary dramatically by world region.

Metal AM eliminates this concern entirely. The process simply doesn’t generate any toxic byproducts, which guarantees that air and water quality won’t be directly harmed.Conventionally made components can leave a much bigger carbon footprint than 3D printed parts.A less obvious environmental cost of traditional manufacturing lies in the efficiency of end-use products. Recent successes in metal 3D printing have changed what’s possible for fuel efficiency in a variety of places. The technology has enabled huge design improvements that shave off weight without compromising strength.

Lessening the Carbon Footprint Through AM-Enabled Design

3D printing allows for the manufacture of parts with complex internal geometries, often in ways that are impossible for conventional techniques to match. The upshot is that design changes that combine multiple parts into a single component can often be completed without sacrificing functionality–or feasibility. This accomplishes the goal of lowering cost and lead times by simplifying the manufacturing process, but it also comes with significant environmental advantages.

Additive Manufacturing Optimizes Designs & Efficiency

As the world marches toward an increasingly tenuous climate future, the costs of a suboptimal part made through traditional manufacturing must be considered right alongside the more tangible impacts described above. There are countless heavy or less-than-aerodynamic components in applications across every sector that could be improved significantly with the design freedom afforded by metal AM. In aggregate, the emissions reductions that are now feasible through projects like GE’s Advanced Turboprop engine would represent major improvement for humanity’s overall carbon footprint. Metal 3D printing doesn’t yet offer all the answers, but in a growing percentage of manufacturing situations, it’s a step in the right direction for our planet.

References:

3DEO. (n.d.). Environmental Impact of Additive Manufacturing. Retrieved from https://news.3deo.co/environmental-impact-of-additive-manufacturing

Questions:

  1. How is 3D printing reducing the carbon footprint?
  2. How is 3D printing reducing wastage?
  3. How is 3D printing optimizing designs and increasing efficiency?