IoT- Predictions for 2017

In this post we will try to foresee what is in store for IoT in 2017.

IoT Will Impact the Omnichannel– The convergence of digital and physical worlds across multiple channels has dramatically changed how businesses reach and manage customer relationships. This results in a transformation of marketing.

“Things” Grow Up and Get Smarter– The average amount of computing power is growing and things are getting smarter and more connected.

Data Collection Migrates to the Cloud– Next year, data collection will move to the cloud. One of the big purposes will be to use AI algorithms to recognize not only someone’s speech but also how to optimize the operations of a machine.

Companies Will Develop More Sensical IoT Products– In 2017, we will see a growing number of consumer-facing connected products that use connectivity to solve real problems. Winning IoT products will have a service component.

Standards Will Remain Messy– There is nothing close to a shared language, and there are a plethora of competing standards.

Tesla’s Elon Musk recently made waves recently by promising that, by the end of 2017, he’ll have a car ready that can drive from Los Angeles to New York without the need for a human driver.

Source- http://www.ioti.com/iot-trends-and-analysis/11-iot-predictions-2017

TPP: What’s in it for Vietnam?

In this article we will discuss the impact of TPP on Vietnam.

Vietnam is likely to be the biggest winner of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Vietnam’s economy relies largely on exports and TPP slashes an estimated 18,000 tariffs among the dozen participating countries. In a decade, the country’s gross domestic product will be boosted 11 percent and exports may soar 28 percent in the period as companies move factories to the Southeast Asian country.

FOREIGN INVESTMENT- Vietnam’s low-wage economy means a lot of foreign firms would look to relocate their operations here. Key industries for this are- logistics, industrial parks, fisheries and garments.

APPAREL– Reduced import duties in the U.S. and Japan will benefit the country’s apparel manufacturers. Vietnam may have a 50 percent increase in apparel and footwear exports in 10 years, according to the Eurasia Group.

SEAFOOD– Elimination of import taxes on shrimp, squid and tuna, now averaging 6.4 percent-7.2 percent will benefit this industry. However, Vietnam will still face strict rules-of-origin on materials, which could limit these benefits.

GLOBAL COMPETITION– Vietnam’s agricultural industry, particularly livestock, and pharmaceutical companies are expected to struggle with the more efficient global operators.

Current Situation

Overall, the TPP is very favorable for Vietnam; it is aggressively seeking economic partners to balance its relationship with China. However, the agreement still needs to be passed by the governments of the 12 nations. The failure of TPP would leave Vietnam more economically isolated and dependent on China. The uncertainty of the TPP is holding Vietnam from committing to the deal.

Source- http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-10-08/more-shoes-and-shrimp-less-china-reliance-for-vietnam-in-tpp

TPP: What’s in it for Australia?

In this article we will discuss the impact of TPP on Australia.

Over the long term, Australia would probably benefit from increased productivity and access for Australian industry to parts of Asia that are currently closed to it. However, the advantages for Australian consumers are not that obvious.

SUGAR– One of the most lucrative markets that Australia wants access to is America’s sugar consumers but this may be a struggle as the US sugar lobby is very powerful.

DAIRY- The US and New Zealand all want more access to Canada’s milk market, which the government has traditionally restricted supply to thereby keeping prices high.

MEDICINE- Currently, the government sets the highest price and also subsidizes the cost of these medicines. But the US wants the market to be less regulated to benefit new medicine manufacturers.

REGIONAL COOPERATION- Members of the TPP account for nearly 40 per cent of the global GDP and Australia would benefit from being part of the regional supply chain.

Current Situation

Many of the sweeteners that Australia are hoping for, including access to America’s sugar consumers and to Canada’s dairy market, are probably unlikely to happen. This has some National MPs starting a “no sugar, no deal” campaign, which demands Australia abandon negotiations if access to new sugar markets is not included. Also, there is speculation that the US could be using the agreement as a way of limiting China’s expansion. This has triggered a rival Chinese deal, the RCEP, which excludes the US and which Australia is also involved with.

Source- http://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/the-transpacific-partnership-agreement-whats-in-it-for-australia/news-story/418aaf44c026a90a6febfc908481c838

Industrial IoT vs Consumer IoT

In this article we will talk about IIoT and clear up certain misconceptions that you may have.

What is IIoT?- The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is simply, the use of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies in manufacturing. It incorporates machine learning and big data technology, harnessing the sensor data, machine-to-machine (M2M) communication and automation technologies.

Misconception: The IIoT is the same as the consumer Internet of Things (IoT)

The IIoT includes IoTdevices located in industrial settings. This maybe a factory floor, a high-speed train system, a hotel, a municipal lighting system, or within the energy grid itself. The requirements for IIoT are far more stringent than the consumer IoT. There can be no compromises in control, security, reliability in tough environments and it needs to be autonomous with little or no human intervention. These devices are built to withstand the test of time.

Peer to Peer rather than Push-Pull

While consumer IoT is linked to human-perceived comfort, security, and efficiency. The industrial networks have basic operating roles that do not require human intervention. Operations that must happen too quickly, too reliably, from too harsh or remote an environment to make it practical to push-pull data from any kind of centralized Internet server or the cloud. A major goal for the IIoT is to help autonomous communities of devices to operate more effectively, peer to peer, without relying on exchanging data beyond their communities.

The IIoT to IoT link

Individually, industrial devices generate the “small data” that, in the aggregate, combines to become the “big data” used for IoT analytics and intelligent control. IIoT devices that are IP-enabled could retain their ability to operate without human intervention, yet still receive input or provide small-data output via the IoT.

What is the real IIoT opportunity?

The real opportunity of the IIoT is not to pretend that it’s the same as the IoT, but rather to provide industrial device networks with an affordable and easy migration path to IP. This approach will build bridges to the IIoT, so that any given community of devices can achieve its full potential. An example of this is the IzoT platform of devices developed by Echelon.

Source- http://radar.oreilly.com/2014/02/the-industrial-iot-isnt-the-same-as-the-consumer-iot.html

IoT- 101

“Internet of things” or IoT is one of those buzzwords that everyone keeps talking about but hardly anybody truly understands what it is. We at DCMME decided it was time for us to demystify IoT.

What’s IoT?– The IoT is a giant network of connected “things”. Simply put, this is the concept of basically connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). Some common examples of IoT devices include the Amazon Echo, Smart Watch, Nest Learning Thermostat and the Philips Hue-Smart Home Lighting.

Why IoT?- Say for example you bought some meat from your nearby grocery on Sunday. The next day the batch of meat that you bought was recalled by the manufacturer. What if your refrigerator sends you a text that you need to throw out that piece of meat? What if the refrigerator knew when it was running low on supplies and automatically re-ordered more? What if the wearable device you used in the workplace could tell you when and where you were most active and productive and shared that information with other devices that you used while working? On a broader scale, the IoT can be applied to things like transportation networks: “smart cities”.

This is part of a series of articles on Internet of Things.

Source- http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobmorgan/2014/05/13/simple-explanation-internet-things-that-anyone-can-understand/