The TPP would require us to limit food labeling and to import meat and poultry that do not meet U.S. food safety standards.

The TPP would require us to allow food imports if the exporting country claims that their safety regime is “equivalent” to our own even if it violates the key principles of our food safety laws. These rules would effectively outsource domestic food inspection to other countries.
 
Under the TPP, any U.S. food safety rule on pesticides, labeling or additives that is higher than international standards would be subject to challenge as “illegal trade barriers.” The U.S. could be required to eliminate these rules and allow in the unsafe food under threat of trade sanctions.
 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration already inspects less than 1% of all seafood imports for health hazards. Entering into the TPP with Malaysia and Vietnam, both TPP negotiating parties and major seafood exporters, would increase seafood imports and further overwhelm inspectors’ limited ability to ensure the safety of our food. Some TPP countries have serious shrimp and fish safety issues. For example, even with the minimal inspections, high levels of contaminants have been found in Vietnam’s seafood.

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